Active Standard

IEEE C37.114-2014

IEEE Guide for Determining Fault Location on AC Transmission and Distribution Lines

Electrical faults on transmission and distribution lines are detected and isolated by system protective devices. Once the fault has been cleared, outage times can be reduced if the location of the fault can be determined more quickly. The techniques and application considerations for determining the location of a fault on ac transmission and distribution lines are outlined in this guide. Traditional approaches and the primary measurement techniques used in modern devices are reviewed: one- and two-terminal impedance-based methods and traveling-wave methods. Application considerations include: two- and three-terminal lines, series-compensated lines, parallel lines, untransposed lines, underground cables, fault resistance effects, and other power system conditions, including those unique to distribution systems.

Sponsor Committee
PE/PSRCC - Power System Relaying and Control
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Status
Active Standard
PAR Approval
2010-09-30
Superseding
C37.114-2004
Board Approval
2014-12-10
History
Published:
2015-01-30

Working Group Details

Society
IEEE Power and Energy Society
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Sponsor Committee
PE/PSRCC - Power System Relaying and Control
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Working Group
C37.114_WG - INACTIVE - Revision of C37.114 Fault Location Guide
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IEEE Program Manager
Malia Zaman
Contact
Working Group Chair
Joe Mooney
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C37.114-2004

IEEE Guide for Determining Fault Location on AC Transmission and Distribution Lines

Electrical faults on transmission and distribution lines are detected and isolated bysystem protective devices. Once the fault has been cleared, outage times can be reduced if thelocation of the fault can be determined more quickly. This guide outlines the techniques andapplication considerations for determining the location of a fault on ac transmission and distributionlines. The document reviews traditional approaches and the primary measurement techniques usedin modern devices: one-terminal and two-terminal impedance-based methods and traveling wavemethods. Application considerations include: two- and three-terminal lines, series-compensatedlines, parallel lines, untransposed lines, underground cables, fault resistance effects, and otherpower system conditions, including those unique to distribution systems.

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No Inactive-Reserved Standards
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